Minute Book 3: 1724-August

In Cornell’s digital copy of the original minutes, August 1724 starts here

In Library and Archives Canada’s digital copy of the original minutes, August 1724 starts here

The commissioners began to prepare for another major treaty conference with Governor William Burnet and the Six Nations by sending Lawrence Claessen to invite them to come to Albany on September 10th. They asked that the total delegation not exceed 70 people, probably because of the expenses involved in hosting such events. Claessen was told to come back to Albany with the most distant group.

More far nations came to trade. On August 7th, the “Kenondadies” arrived. They also condoled the deaths of both Pieter Schuyler and Hendrick Hansen. They gave twelve hands of wampum to wash off the tears of their relatives, and many skins and furs “to bury them.” I have not found any informations on “Kenondadie.” It might be a misspelling of “Tionondadie,” a name for the Petun  people who were close allies of the Wendat (Huron). Or perhaps it is the name of a particular village.

Jacob Adatsondie and the other messengers sent by the Six Nations to the Eastern Indians returned and gave an account to the commissioners, but they did not write down what they said. However their next entry concerns a group of Schaghticoke Indians who had gone to Missisquoi, an Abenaki territory on Lake Champlain and joined in the attacks on New England. The commissioners decided to have Johannes Knickerbacker (who had land at Schaghticoke and a connection to the Schaghticokes as an interpreter) arrange to send a delegation of “trusty Indians” with wampum belts to persuade the Schaghticokes to come back.

The oath against trading Indian goods to the French was offered to a number of Albany merchants, including some of the commissioners, pursuant to the Act of 1720 prohibiting the trade. Those who took the oath included Johannes Cuyler, Philip Livingston, Evert Wendell, Abraham Cuyler, Nicholas Bleecker, Gerrit Roseboom, and Robert Roseboom. John (Johannes) Schuyler refused to take it. The sheriff was directed to levy a fine against him of 100 pounds.

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About hopefulwanderer

Writer, researcher, archivist, etc. @ahhunter
This entry was posted in 1724, Albany Indian Commissioners, Iroquois History, New York History, Schaghticoke History, Trade and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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