Minute Book 3: 1728-October Part 1: Governor Montgomerie’s First Conference with the Six Nations, Schaghticokes, and “River Indians”

Governor John Montgomerie’s first conference with New York’s native allies  began on October first.  The records contain two versions. What was probably the official version begins on page 299a of the records and is printed in DRCHNY volume 5, beginning at 5:859. Another version, likely a first draft, begins on page 263 of the records. It is worded a little differently but the sense is the same.

Land at Oswego for the English to Raise Food, Evidence of Haudenosaunee Orchards?

The Haudenosaunee sachims welcomed the new governor in a meeting held before the conference opened. They expressed sorrow over the death of King George I and celebrated the succession of George II in a speech that is interesting because it uses metaphors related to the cultivation of fruit trees, including grafting branches and covering roots, suggesting that these techniques may have been part of their practices during this period. The conference opened the next day with a speech by the new governor, who described his difficult five-month journey across the Atlantic before conveying greetings from the new King of England and renewing the covenant chain in his name.

Governor Montgomerie then asked to have land at Oswego marked off for the English to raise food for the troops. The Six Nations (Haudenosaunee) agreed to this idea, naming Laurence Claessen as the best person to assist with measuring and marking the land.  They refused to say how much land they would provide, explaining that they needed to consult with people not present at the conference before they could give a figure. No mention was made of a sale and no deed was signed. The orders given to Laurence Claessen after the conference ended instruct him to carry out a precise survey of “as Large a Tract of Land at Oswego as possible you Can” and bring it back to the commissioners.

A Compromise on Alcohol

Besides discussing the land, the parties renewed the Covenant Chain with each other, exchanged gifts including wampum, and went over issues familiar from previous conferences. The Haudenosaunee asked the new governor to prevent traders from bringing alcohol to their country because it was leading to violence and even murders. He insisted that the traders needed to bring rum to refresh the soldiers at Oswego and asked them not to molest the traders. Eventually they agreed to the use of alcohol at the Oswego Trading House and Montgomerie agreed to forbid the English to take it to the communities of the Six Nations. The Haudenosaunee also asked that the traders sell pure rum rather than mixing it with water. It is possible that the illness that still afflicted the troops at Oswego was related to problems with Oswego’s water supply which could affect rum if the tainted water was used to dilute it.

Who Defends Fort Oswego Against the French?

The governor also asked the Haudenosaunee to protect Fort Oswego against possible French attacks. They responded that it was their understanding that it had been constructed to protect them rather than for them to protect. Eventually they agreed to assist with its defense, acknowledging their experience with French attacks. They urged   the English both to make sure that the traders bring guns and ammunition to Iroquois and to keep military supplies on hand at Albany in case of need. Both sides promised to support each other and boasted of their military prowess.

The governor also urged the Haudenosaunee not to join the French and their allies in the war against a “Remote Nation,” probably meaning the Meskwaki (Fox). They asked for cheaper prices for goods and requested Joseph Van Size and Hendrick Wemp to work as smith and armorer in their country, adding that the French smith there was old and going blind.

Anglo-Dutch Farmers Encroach on Schaghticoke Lands

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Corn growing near the Knickerbocker Mansion Historic Site at Schaghticoke NY, August 2015

Governor Montgomerie renewed the Covenant Chain in a separate conference with the Schaghticoke and River Indians, for which they thanked him. He urged them to bring back those of their nation who had moved away, but they explained that it was difficult because they had less and less land at Schaghticoke to plant on. They told him that recently their European neighbors had planted on the Scaghticoke’s land, allowed their cattle to destroy Schaghticoke crops, and carried off corn from their fields. The governor asked for the names of the trespassers so he could punish them.

In Library and Archives Canada’s digital copy of the original minutes, the entry for the draft version starts here on p. 263. The transcription is below.

[0530] 263

X                                 Albany p:rmo Octob.r 1728

Present

His Ex.cie John

Montgomerie Esq.r

Fran. Harrison }

Esq.rs of the Council

Ph: Livingston}

The Comm:rs of Ind:n  Affairs

The Sachims of the Six Nations

being this day Arrived desired to have a Conference

with his Ex:cy Jn.o Montgomerie Esq:r before His

Ex.cy Made his Proposition to them who appeared at

His Ex:cies Lodgings and Made the following Speech

Brother Corlaer

Last fall you Sent us a messuage, w:th a

Token to Each Nation that his late Majesty King

George the first was deceased for which wee was very

[Sorry – crossed out] Much Concernd and heartily Sorry because he

Was a King of Peace a Mighty Protector

of his Subjects and allies, but at the Same

Time wee reced the good news that his Son Prince

George now King George the Second Was already

Crown’d in his Place hopeing that he may follow

his fathers Steps — Give a Few Skinns

You Acquainted us at the Same Time

that King George was a young man Wee hope he

may Follow his Fathers Steps that he may be as a

Large Flourishing Tree that the branches thereof

may reatch up to Heaven that he may be Seen of

all People and Nations in the World

Wee Ingraft Siantes on the Same branches

Which Wee hope may Thrive and that the Leaves

thereof May never Fade nor Fall off but that the

Same May grow and Flourish that his Majestys

Subjects and his Allies May Live in Peace and

Quiet

[0531] 263a

quiet under the Shade of the same: Gave a Few Skinns

Just Now Wee grafted on the Large fine

Flourishing Tree Now Wee Come and Cover the Roots

Thereof in Case there might be any Part of them bear

that the Roots may be Sound and Spread themselves

through the whole Earth that the Tree may Stand fast

and Firm that no Storms nor Violent Tempestes may

be able to Move Shake or Endanger the Same, Gave a

Few Skinns

Wee have now done wt wee Intended to Say at

Present

His Excell:y answerd Them

I am Thankfull for your kind Speech His Maj:tie

has ordered me to Tell you that he Will be your kind

Father and Protector, I shall too Morrow Acquaint

With the Messuage His Majesty has orderd me to

Deliver to you And gave them a barrell of

Beer to drink his Majestys Health

[0532] 264

Propositions Made by his Ex:cie John Montgomerie

Esq:r Captain Generall and Governour in Chiefe of the

Provinces New York New Jersey &c. to the Sachims of the

Six Natkions viz:t Maquase Onydes Cayouges, Onondages

Sinnekes and Tuskarois in Albany the 2d day of October

in the Second year of his Maj.ties Reign Ann.o Domni 1728

Present

His Ex:cie John

Montgomerie

Esq.r

Geo: Clerke

Francis Harrison

Ph: Livingston            } Esq.rs of his Maj.ties

Capt. Long                              Councill

[Lt.] James

D Lansee

The Comm:rs of

Indian Affairs

The Mayor

[&] Aldermen

Brothers

The Concern you Exprest

yesterday for the Loss of his late Majesty the King of

Great Brittain will Recommed you very much to the favour

of his Son the Present King who as he Succeeds to his throne

Inheritts all his Virtues and I hope the kind Message

I am to deliver to you from him Will Comfort you for his

Fathers Death. Give three Stroud blankets

[0533] 264a

Brethren

It is w.th great Pleasure that I meet you here and

I am verry Sorry that I Could not do it Sooner, but you will

be Convenced that it was not my Fault when I tell you that

in Crossing the great Lake I met wth So Violent Storms that

I was driven Quite off this Coast and it being in the Winter

Season was Forced to go a great way Southard to refit the

Man of War in Which I Came So it was five Months after

I Came from England before I arrived in New Yorke. The

business of that Province w.ch was Absolutely necessary

to be done at my first arrival has detained me there Ever

Since and retarded my delivering [to you – crossed out] the kind Message

I am Charg’d with from my Master the King of Great

Brittain His Majesty has order’d me to Tell you that

he Loves you as a Father dos his Children, and that

this affection [in him – crossed out] towards you is occasiond by his

being Certainly Informed that you are a brave and

Honest People the Two Qualitys in the World that

Recommend most Either particular Persons or a

People to him. He has also been Informed that you Love

his Subjects the English and that you desire to Live w.th

them as Brethren. He has therefore Commanded me to

Renew the old Covenant Chain between you and all

his Subjects in North America and

[several lines crossed out appear to say “I have (illeg.] Indians under his Majesty’s Protection, and to Make it Brighter if possible than ever it was before]

to make it brighter if

Possible than Ever it was before and I expect you will give me

[illeg.] to do the like on your Parts

Give a Large Belt of Wampum

Brethren

Besides the two Qualitys of Bravery and

Honesty his Majesty is convinced that you are a wise

People and good Judges of your own Intrest; How

happy then must you think your Selves when the greater

and Powerfullest Monarch in Christendom Sends me

here to Confirm the ancient Friendship betwixt you

and his Subjects to Assure you of his Fatherly Care

[0534] 265

And to tell you that he thinks himselfe Oblidged to Love

and Protect you as his own Children You need fear no

Enemies while you are true to your Alliance w.th him; I

Promise you to take Care that none of your Brethren here

Shall do you Wrong and if any other Neighbouringe

Nations be So bold as to attempt to Disturb you, You

need not fear what they Dare or Can do, Since you have the

King of Great Brittain on your Side, who is a Prince

Early Initiated in the Art of War and formed by Nature

for the greatest Military Atchievements, will when Ever

there is Occasion for it Put himselfe at the head of the finest

body of Troops in the World who are all his own Naturall

born Subjects has at Present a Fleet of Shipps in So good

Order and So well Commanded that they would be Masters

of the great Lake altho’ the Fleets of all the Kings in Europe

Were Joyn’d against them. Give a Belt

Brethren

After what I have Told you I am Convinced

That So wise a People as you are will glory in behaving

as becomes the Faithfull Children of So great and Powerful

a King who Loves you and will Resent any Injury done

you as if it was done to his Children on the other Side of

the great Lake  Gave a [belt – crossed out] String

Brethren

I expect you are now Convinced that the

Garrison and house Erected at Oswego is not only for the

Conveniency of the far Indians to Carry on their Trade w:th the

Inhabitants of this Province but also for your Security and

Conveniency to Trade there for Such Necessarys as you

have Occasion for and at as Easy Terms as if none of the

upper Nations Came to Trade thither — I make no doubt

but you will at all Times willingly defend this Garrison

against all Attempts which may be Made against

It

[0535] 265a

It according to your Former Promises and Engagemts

I desire you to give and Grant unto your kind Father

His Most Sacred Majesty a Convenient Tract of Land to

be Cleared and Manured for his Men to Raise Provisions

for them and Pasturadge for their Cattle; Give a Belt I heare that you

have been often apprehensive that a Trade w:th the far Nations

Would be to your Prejudice, as that it would Make the

Goods you Want dear But I Can assure you that the Woolen

Manufactory in England is Able to Supply the whole

[Christian – crossed out] World. Therefore the greater trade is Carried on

the More and greater will be the Supply and Cheaper

than formerly; And I do Entreat you to be kind to the

Traders and not Molest them as they go up but to lett

Them pass Quietly Give a String of Wampum

I am Informed that the Indians from Canada who are

gone up w:th the French Army agt. a Remote Nation of

Indians have been Among you Endeavourd to Intice

your young men to go to Warr w.th them agt. a People who

never do anoy nor Molest you Am glad they have refusd

to Joyn w.th them, whereby you Show you Endeavour to

Cultivate a good Understanding with those Indians

Make them thereby your Friends and Encourage the

good Design of Promoteing a Trade w:th us and you;

I do Expect they will Persist in their good Deportment

Towards those and all other Remote Nations which

Will be a Means to Strenghten your Alliances and

Make you a great People  Give a String of Wampum

I do Inform you that His most Gracious Sovereign King

George my Mast.r your Indulgent Father has orderd me to make

you in his name a Handsome Present in Such Goods as are

most Suitable for you w:ch you Shall Receive as Soon as you

Shall have Given me your answer  Give a String

[0538] 267

X

Annswer made by the Sachims of the Six

Nations 1728 The Maquace Oneydes Onondages

Cayouges Sinnekes and Tuskaroras to His Excy John

Montgomorie Esq:r The 4.o day of October 1728

Present

His Ex.cy John Mont

gomerie Esq:r &c.

Geo: Clarke     }

Ph: Livingston }          Esq.rs of the Councill

The Comm:rs of Ind Affairs

Brother Corlaer

Wee are very glad that you are

arrived here in good health you Told us that your

Master the King of Great Brittain had Sent you

It is a very Dangerous Voyage in Coming over the

great Lake, The reason that wee are glad you are

arrived in health is because of the good Messuage

you bring us of your great Master the King of Great

Brittain, Wee would have been very Sorry If any

accident had happend to your Ex.cie in this dangerous

Voyage

 

Brother

You acquainted us w:th your Coming

Hither that you have Mett w:th an Accident and been

Driven from the Coast &c. and been five Months in

Coming to [the – crossed out] your Governmt.

 

Brother

You Acquainted us that was the

Reason that Detained you At your first

Arrivall

[0539] 267a

 

Arrivall from Meeting us no Sooner

You Told us also you was orderd by the

Great King your Master to Renew in his Name the

Old Covenant Chain w:th us, not only to Renew the same

but To make it brighter and Stronger than Ever

Brother Corlaer

You have renewed the old

Covenant Chain w.th the five nations in the name

of your Master now the King of Great Brittain

Wee Renew the old Covenant Chain in the like

Manner                        Give a Belt

 

Brother

This Silver Coven.t Chain wherein Wee are

[Joynd – crossed out] Linkd together That wee Make Stronger & Cleaner

that the Same be bright, Brother Wee shall not give

you any occasion of the breach of our Covenant If you

are Like Minded Then Wee and our Childrens Children

Shall Live in Peace

 

Brother Corlaer

You Acquainted us also that the

Great King your Master and our Father, Bears

great kindness to us as a Father Doth to his

Children; And If any Harm or Attempts shall be

Made on us, That our Father will Resent it

as If it was done to his Children on the other Side

Of the great Lake for w.ch kind Messuage Wee return

you our most hearty Thanks — Gave a Belt

 

Brother Corlaer           Wee shall not repeat your Excies Proposition

but Only the Principall Matters therein Contained

 

[0540] 268

 

Brother Corler

You Told us what was the reason why

His Majesty the King our Father so Affectionatly

Loved us for Two Qualifications of being an honest &

brave People

Brother Corlaer

It is true as you Say that the Six Nations

When they are Sober and not in Drink They will not

Molest or Injure any body, but there is one thing in

the Way that is Strong Liquour Which your Subjects

bring up to our Country — Therefore brother Wee desire

you very Strongly to Prohibitt the Sending or Carrying up

any Strong Liquour for that Will by one thing or

Other Create a Quarrell between your People and our young

Indians, our Ancestors have Fetched the Rum out of

this City when they wanted it. Let them who want Rum

be it Man or Woman Fetch it [hither – crossed out] from hence — Therefore Wee

Desire again that you do not Refuse our Request but to

Grant it Effectually; If you knew it Wee have already

Lost Many Men thro Liquor which has been brought

up; that our People kill one another Give a String of Wampum

This is now a day of Joy & gladness that wee meet together in this place

of Treaty That wee May Smoke a Pipe in friendship and it is very

acceptable to us to meet yr Excy here in good health —

Brother Corlaer

You have recomended us relateing the Traders

Who go up to lett them Pass and Repass freely without any

Molestation; Wee Promise to do them all Friendly Offices

in our Power, Let them Come w.th Such Goods as Powder

Lead Strowds and other dry Goods [&c.] They will be welcome

Except w.th Rum —

Brother Corlaer

you desired us for a Tract of Land near

The House at Oswego for the men to Plant on To raise

Provisions for them and Pasturadge for their Cattle

[0541] 268a

Brother Corlaer

It is with full Consent of the Six Nations

[illeg. crossed out] allowed you to Plant and sow at or near Oswego

and to have Pasturadge for your Cattle according to your Desire

and Wee shall make out such a Tract of Land as shall be necessary

to Raise Provisions for the men and Pasturadge for

their Cattle but Wee should not be Pleased that after it

be markd out, You do go beyond the Limitts which

Wee do Fix Give a String [Give a Belt – Crossed out]

Brother Corlaer

You Told us also that you Expected If

any Attempts be Made Against the House at Oswego

Wee Should Defend it; Wee Acquaint you that last

year when Liberty was Desired to build there it was

told us that the same was built there on Purpose to

Defend and Protect the Six Nations because It is

a Fronteer of our Nations Therefore Wee Rely on

your Promises to Perform them

Brother Corlaer

you told us also that the Six Nations

Imagined that If the farr Indians bought

Goods there thy would become Dear, but that the more

Trade there is the more Goods will be sent hither

and that there is Wool Enough in England to Supply

the whole World w:th Goods

Brother Corlaer

you acquainted us that you have

Goods Enough for the whole world w:ch Wee are very glad

to Hear the House at Oswego is such a Convenient Place

for Trade as Can be any where It is a place where all the

farr Indians must necessarily pass Wee desire also

that goods May be Sold Some what Cheaper to us

and that would be a Motive to Draw all the farr

Nations to us and Joyn w:th us for thro’ Cheapness

 

[0542] 269

of goods will become peace & make unity Give a belt

of wampum

Brother Corlaer

You told us you had been Informed

That when the french Army who went up Last Spring

against the farr Nations that Some French Indians

had been amongst us to Intice some of our young men

to go to Warr w.th them, That they are a Peaceable People

against whom the French now make Warr. That you

Was glad wee refused to go s.th them That those Indians

by these Means would become Friends to the 6 Nations

Brother Corlaer

It is True that the French have desired

It from us, but wee refused and Rejected their Proposall

because wee are Convinced that the French bear us no

Friendship, and wee have no very great Dependance

On them, for their Army Could have Subdued the Six

Nations, and Instead of going to the Foxes Could

Have masterd us While it has been Peace has

made us Severall Threatnings

Brother Corlaer

You have recommended unto us

that wee should Cultivate a Good Understanding

With the farr Indians and Draw them as Much

as Wee Can It is True Wee have had Warr agt. this or

that Nations, but never been the First Aggressors, But

Those who made Warr s:th us have Felt the Weight of

It Wee Promise you to Draw as Many farr Indians

to this Government as Wee Can — Give a Belt

 

[0543] 269a

Brother Corlaer

You Acquainted us also that you

had a fine Present for us Wherefore Wee thank you heartily

you told us that as soon as Wee had given our answer

you would Deliver it But as it is Late Wee Desire you

may give the same too Morrow

His Ex.cys answer

In answer

As to what you desire in Relation that no Rum should

be Sent up to your Country It is absolutely Necessary to

Send Rum to Oswego for the refreshmt. of the Men there

and those who Do Carry up Provisions I shall give Strict

Orders that none of my People do send or Carry up

and Strong Liquour to your People If any shall Trans=

=gress I Expect you will Inform against them; For

your know how Difficult it is to Restrain them from

Selling as well as is Difficult for your People from

bringing it

I thank you in my Master the King of Great

Brittains name for the land you have Granted

for the use of his Garrison at Oswego, I desire you will

Express how Many 1000 Faddom in length and

breadth you Will grant him, and I will Send up a fitt

Person to Marke out the bounds w:th you and I promise

you not to go beyond these bounds, by this you Will

See that the English do not Deal w:th you as the French

Do Who Take your Land without your Leave

The house at Oswego Was built for your Protection

So I Expect you will Assist me If it be attacked

by any body whatsoever that you will assist the

English

[0544] 270

Garrison there in Defending it for Nothing Can be

more Naturall than for you to Assist in the Defence of a

Place which is Maintained for your Security

I desire you to Send Some of your People too

Morrow Morning to Receive the Presents

Albany the 5.o of October 1728

A Private Conferrence Held w:th His Excell.y John

Montgomerie Esq:r &c. and Two Sachims of Each of the

Six Nations

 

Brother Corlaer

Wee are Very glad that you have

Renewed the ancient Covenant and strengthned the

Same w:th us and w:ch wee have on both Sides hitherto

kept Inviolable

Wee are also very glad that you our brother

Corlaer Who is now Come over to us is a wise Prudent

man. Wee must Esteem you So because you have spoken

very Sensibly — Brother — It Seemed yesterday as

If you were Displeased [dissatisfied – crossed out] that Wee did not Promise to

Defend the house at Oswego It has been of old Concluded

betwen your and our Ancestors that wee should be

one body and one heart, So what [was to be – crossed out] is Done to one

Member the whold must be Sensible of it and

Defend

[0545] 270a

Defend the Injury Done to any Part of it

Brother Corlaer

Wee have just now Told you that wee are one

body and one Heart you Desired us that when any

Attempt be Made ag.t the House at Oswego that Wee

should Defend It, how Can you Imagine that Wee

Should not do so, for wee have no Affection for the French

Who have been our Ancient Enemies Who Wee in the

Late Warr had almost Subdued & Conquerd for Wee

have Run Down and Destroyed whole Villages So

that If the bones of the French and of us Were gatherd

together It would make Heaps as high as houses

Brother Corlaer

Yesterday when wee made our answer Wee

did not Proceed in Regular order Wee Understood from

you that when any of our Neighbours might be So

bold as to Disturb us Wee need not fear while our

King our Common Father will Protect us who has

a Large Fleet of Shipps Ready to Employ on any

Occasion

You Told us that our great King is very

Watchfull to have So great a fleet ready on all occasions

Which is very Prudent, but that is a great Distance from

hence, and Can’t Defend us here. Wee hope that you

Will be Pleased to Take the Same Care here to have Every

thing in readiness in Case wee or you should be molest:d

by our Enemies for w.ch End it would be very Proper to

have a Magazine at this Place of all thing is necessary

for Warr on Occasion

Brother Corlaer           Wee Desire for the last Time that you may not

be Negligent to have a Magazine here of all things

Necessarys

[0546] 271

Necessary, to be ready on all occasions, but to grant

it and gett it Done, for wee may be attackd by our Enemies

on a Sudden, and when a Magazine is Furnishd, Wee

may want for nothing, for Wee have never made any

Promises on our side to former Governours but wee

Performd them

Brother Corlaer

You may Possibly know more than wee Do, and

know If there be any Likelihood of War, between the

Kings of Great Brittain and France Wee Desire you to

Inform us w:th what you know about that Matter. If there

be any Probability of It Wee begg that Wee may be Informd

and well Supplyed w:th Ammunition, for Wee have never

Waged War w:th any Nation but Wee have Subdued &

Conquerd them

Brother Corlaer

This is the only Method of Security for you and

us to have Amunition Enough in Readiness, In former

Times Wee were sufficiently Supplied w:th it by which Wee

Conquerd out Enemies, and for w:ch Wee were oblidged to

our Brethren who supplied us Cheap, for then Wee Could

buy more for one Bear Skin, than Wee Can for four or

five Now

Brother Corlaer

Wee have Spoake yesterday relateing the Rum

That your People shou’d not Carry it up to our Country

for If Wee See it wee Cannot forbear to buy and Drink it

Wee Desired that no Rum may be brought up, but

Pray understand us right, Wee Do not Mean that no

Rum should be Carryed up at all but none brought

in our Castles, Let it be brought to the Tradeing house

at

[0547] 271a

At Oswego, but Pray Take Care that the Traders Do not

mix it w.th Water Let them Sell Pure Rum and those

who buy let them Pay for it

Brother Corlaer

This is what wee should have Said yesterday

Wee begg again that you give strict orders to your

People not to Carry up Rum to Our Castles, where they

Come and Intice us to buy it and Drink it Let them

bring it to Oswego but at the Same Time give Particular

Directions that they bring thither Guns and Amunition

and Such things as Wee have occasion for but not

Rum only

Brother

Wee Desire also If it be in your Power to Let us have

goods Cheaper than they are Sold to us at Present

Brother            You Desired us yesterday how many 1000

Faddom the Land Wee have granted to his Majtie

at Oswego Should Extend in Length and breadth which

is a thing wee Can’t very well Tell now while Severall

Sachims are at home in our Castles w.th whom Wee

Ought first to Consult as to the Quantity Who would

Otherwise be Displeased at it

Brother

The Land w:ch you Desired is absolutely granted to

His Majesty our Common Father on w:ch you may

Depend for it is agreed by us all that he shall have it

but as to the Quantity Wee must Consult first w:th the

rest of the Sachims, and then shall Marke it out

Wee have Said that wee should marke out ye Land for

you when Wee Come home & have Consulted ye. rest of ye Sachims

Pray Let a fit Person go up w:th us and named Lourence

Clace the Interpreter who they Said is one of us and understands

Our Language, Wee have Done Speaking [now – crossed out] and what

have said now Wee should have Said yesterday in Publick but has been

Neglected

 

[0548] 272

Answer of       His Excelly John Montgomerie Esq:r

Captain Generall & Gov:r in Chiefe of the

Provinces New: Yorke New Jersey &c

Brethren

Now Since I have had Two or three meetings

w:th you, [think – crossed out] Like you better than before, because I am better

acquainted w:th you the kind Answer you have given

will Confirm his Majtie in the good Opinion he had of you

that the thing w.ch Seemed to Displease me yesterday when

you made Some Difficulty to Assist the English to Defend

Oswego was this, that I have orders from the King of Great

Britain our Father to Assist the Six Nations in Case

any of their Enemies should Attack them, but that you

have now Satisfied me and as Wee are Children of one

Common Father, If any Enemies Attack you I will Send

you Assistance and Come my selfe to Defend you If it be

Necessary as to your Trade of Rum and other things

I shall Take Care, that you Shall not be Abused and

what you Demand be Granted according to your Desire

As to what you Desire to know of the King of Great

Brittains Alliance w:th the King of France they are at

Present in very good Friendship together but as there

has been often War between them, The King of Great

Brittain will Always be ready to go to War in Case

the French Attack you or us; I believe he will have

Large Magazines here and in other convenient Places to Supply all

his Children in Case of War

I Consent that Laurence Clase the Interpreter go

up w:th you as you Desire to Marke out the Land, and

I Expect that you will give your kind Father a Large

Trade

You may now when Ever you are ready receive

the Presents I am to make you in name of my Master

the

[0549] 272a

The King of Great Brittain your Father, You shall

have Provisions for your Journey, and Waggons to bring

you to Snachntdy, the Rum shall be Delivered you above

Snachnatdy, for you have shown the Inconveniency of

your young men Getting Drunk w:th it; I wish you w:th

All my Heart a good Journey home and all Happiness

A Sinneke Sachim stood up & Said

Brother Corlaer

It has been Customary when Wee Come here

Towards the fall that a Smith & an Armourer has

been orderd to go w:th us to Worke in our Country. Wee begg

you to Grant us now that Joseph van Sige and Hend

Wemp may be order’d to go up w:th us who are fitt Persons for our

Occasion

His Excelly Answerd them

That he would order a Smith and an Armourer to

be Sent to Worke for them but then he Expected that

they would not Suffer the French Smith who is

now there nor any other from Canada to Reside

among them for the future

[0550] 273

A Speech made by His Excelly John Mont=

=gomerie Esq: Captain Gen:ll and Governour in

Chiefe of the Provinces of New York New Jersey &c

To the Schaakook & River Indians in

Albany the 5:o of Octob: 1728

[Printed DRCHNY 5:868 et seq. with some differences in list of those present and time sequence. Summary Wraxall p. 175-176.]

Present

His Excelly Jno Montgomerie Esq:r

George Clarke}           Esq:rs of His Majties Coun:ll

Ph: Livingston}

 

Captain Long}

Mr. Jam:s D Lansey}

 

Mynd:t Schuyler}

Evert Bancker }

Rutger Bleecker}        Esq:rs Comm:rs

[J]eremy Renslaer}

Children

I Sent for you my Children to give

you fresh assurance’s of the Protection of the Great

King of Great Brittain My Master Our Common

Father and Sovereign and to Acknowledge in this

Publick manner the Just Sense I have for your former

dutifull behaviour and Fidelity to his Royall Predecessors

and your Affection to your Brethren the rest of His

Subjects in these Parts & in his name & by his order

I renew w:th you the Ancient Coven.t Chain & give you a

Present of Such things as are of use to you and I expect

youl Continue firm to your Duty at all Times to Come

as you have Done in Time Past, and in Doing So you

may rest Assured not only of Protection but of all other

good Offices in the Poser of those that are in Authority

under the King our Common Father & Protector

Give a Belt

I am Concern’d I must Tell you that I am

Inform’d that many of your Nation have of late Mis=

=behaved themselves who on Frivolous Pretences and

Wrong Notions have Left their Native Country

Schaakook

[0551] 273a

Schaakook and gone to Live in Canada a place not so

good and Fertile as they Deserted from, I Exhort you to

use all proper Means to pswade them to Return back, &

Proper Care Shall be Taken that they and you Shall

have Sufficient Land and more than you and your

Children can Cultivate and plant on, That you & they

may Again Shelter under the branches & Leaves of

that Tree of Peace which has long since been planted

at Schaakook. Ile Take Care that the Same Shall Flourish

and grow, and when you hear any Rumours be not

Too Credulous as many of you have been Lately, but

Inform me of it and I will undeceive you, and Tell

you the Truth  Give a Belt

The Indians made Answer

Father Corlaer

Wee are very glad that you are Come to Visit your

Children & Rejoyced to See that the Tree w.ch has been long

since Planted at Schaakook which wee thought was

almost Witherd & Decayed is Come to Life again and

getts Nourishm:t and Wee are Extreamly well pleased

to Perceive that the fire w:ch used to burn and was

almost Extinguishd is kindled again Gave Two

Bever Skinns

Father

Wee are much Comforted to hear that you have

Renewed the Ancient Covenant Chain w:th us Wee Do

now do bring fur to wrap it up in that ye Same may not

rust but keep bright and Clean Give Two Beav:r Skinns

Father

Wee are Rejoyced that your Grandfather hath

Such a great value and Esteem for us in Sending you

(one of his Sons) hither to be our Father who Does us

the Honour to Send for us       Give Two Beaver Skinns

[0552] 274

Father

You have recommended unto us that wee should

use our Endeavours to Fetch back from Canada those who

deserted from Schaahkook Wee Promise to use all

Possible means to Perswade them to Return to their

Native Country, Give Two Beaver Skinns

It is Somewhat Difficult for us to Encrease our

Number at Schaahkook It is often Recomended to us

by those in Authority here to Settle there & bring those

back who are gone to Canada for Wee Can Scarcely have

the Land w:ch is Promis’d us and are Molested on that

w:ch is our own by People who Live near us — Wee Came

home Late last Spring from our Hunting and Planted

Some Land; and now this Fall our Indian Corn has

been Carried away

The Fences about our Land are old and rotten

So that the Cattle Distroy much of our Cropps Wee Came

home Late last Spring and found Some of our Land

Planted on by Christians, whom Wee would have paid

for their Trouble but they refused yet wee howed the

Indian Corn Twice, and now your People have ag:t our

Wills and by Violence Carried off the Corn from our

fields

His Excelly: Answerd them

Children

I thank you fore your kind Speech

I shall Acquaint your Grandfather w:t good People

you are

As to the Complaint you have made ag.t

the Christians If you will Let me know the Peoples

names who have Injured you I shall order them

to be Punished and you Satisfied

[0553] 274a

Albany 7:o October 1728

[Printed DRCHNY 5:867 with different wording.]

Present

His Ex.cy John Montgomerie Esq:r

Ph: Livingston

Mynd.t Schuyler

Evert Bancker

Rutger Bleecker

Henry Holland

Peter van Brugh

J: Cuyler

Steph: Groesbeek        } Esq.rs Comm:rs

Evert Windell

Joh: Roseboom

Har. Windell

Reyer Garrison

Abraham Cuyler

Ph. Schuyler

Nicolas Bleeker

Joh.s Lansigh

His Exy not having been able to deliver the

Presents to the Sachims of the 6 Nations in Publick

on Saturday last as he Intended being Prevented by

the Rain the Said Presents were this day Delivered

them by his Said Excy. in Name of His Majtie King

George the Second w:ch Presents Consist of the

following Particulars vizt

66 Fuzees                                40 £ Beads

65 Coats                                  48 Tobacco boxes

66 Hatts                                   54 Looking Glasses

8 Peices Strouds                      23 doz: Clasp knives

6 D.o Duffells                         8 D.o Single

6 D.o Blanketting                   1500 Flints

8 D.o Halfe Thicks                 1000 £ Powder

256 Course Shirts                   12 Casks Tobacco

57 Fine D.o                             1 box Pipes

30 Kettles                                1 Hhd Rum

59 Hatchetts                            6 barrells Porke

14 Doz Stockings

[0554] 275

The Rum shall be Delivered you above

Snachnatdy as I already have Told you, I wish you

a good Journey to your Habitations and hope to meet

again as soon as may be you shall have Provisions for

too Day and for your Journey and too Morrow a Bull

to Hunt, I Desire you to Recommend and Prevent

your young men not to Do mischiefe to the Peoples

Cattle as they go up, I have orderd Two barrells of

Cheer to Drink his Majties Health

[0555] 275a

[Printed in DRCHNY at 5: 868 with different wording.]

The Sachims Answerd

Brother Corlaer

You acquainted us that your Master the King of

Great Brittain our Common Father has Sent w:th you for us

This Present you Could not Deliver it last Saturday by

reason of the Rain, and that the Powder shall be Delivered us

which you Say is very Strong and good, for all which Wee

are very thankfull

Brother Corlaer

Wee are ver glad & Joyfull that wee See you have

Such a great Affection for us this is the Place appoint.d

of old to meet, Wee are very much Rejoyced our Brother

Corlaer is Safely Arrived here because the Sea is So

Dangerous and Tempestious to Cross, Wee have brought

a Small Present to your Exy: for your long Jouney

hither to meet us to Anoint your Feet w.th

Brother

Wee wish you a happy Voyage, and shall be

glad to Hear that you are Safe Arrived for Death follows

in Every where wee have now Done to Speak

A Sachim in behalfe of the Sinnekes said

Brother Corlaer

Wee desired you for a Smith and an Armour.r

but wee Do not hear further of it you Spoake ab.t a French

Smith who is there now, he can make no Worke if any our

Brethren be there from hence for he is an old man and

Can Scarcely See and Desire that Jos. van Size and

Hendrick Wemp do now go up along w:th us — Gave a

Few Skinns

Wee would Fain now have the Smith and armourer

Go

[0556] 276

Go up along up w:th us that wee may be Sure of them

Otherwise It may be Neglected

His Excy Replied

That he would give Effectuall orders to ye Comm:rs to get

the Said Smith and Armourer to go as they Desire that

After they have Divided the Presents they shall have a

barrell of Beer to Drink the Kings Health

 

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About hopefulwanderer

Writer, researcher, archivist, etc. @ahhunter
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